Volume 65 Issue 3 March 2015

A tax on Britain's American colonies was introduced on March 22nd, 1765.

The physician died on March 5th, 1815. 

Virginia Nicholson acknowledges the debt she owes as a popular historian to academics such as Roland Quinault, whose 2001 essay on Britain in the 1950s remains a rich source of information.

 Jerome de Groot highlights some recent historical fiction, en-route encountering Eleanor of Aquitaine, Johannes Gutenberg, Simón Bolívar and the spirit of Marcel Proust.

Roger Hudson details the defining role played by oil in the predominantly Kurdish-populated city of Kirkuk in Iraq.

Robert Colls offers a personal reflection upon the religious roots of the Labour Party.

John Aubrey, best known for his concise and incisive pen portraits of his 17th-century contemporaries, left no diary of his own. Ruth Scurr set herself the challenge of imagining one from the remnants of his life.

Eleventh-century Córdoba was at the heart of the rich culture of Muslim Andalusia. Among its greatest creative figures was Wallada, princess, patron and poet. Leigh Cuen rediscovers one of the most influential women writers in European history.

The people of Brighton offered a warm welcome to the Indian soldiers sent to convalesce at the Sussex resort in the First World War. But the military authorities found much to be nervous about.

The world of shopping in Georgian London offered an array of retail experiences for women in pursuit of the ultimate in fashionable clothing, every bit as sophisticated as those open to the 21st-century shopper.

Fern Riddell investigates the campaign of terror orchestrated by the Edwardian suffragette movement before the First World War and asks why it has been neglected by historians.

The struggle for control of the straits dividing Sicily from southern Italy brought the two great empires of the Mediterranean, Carthage and Rome, head to head. It was a world in which ruthless mercenaries prospered.

How much are actions – especially extreme ones – the result of impersonal historical forces and how much are they dependent upon the impulses of individual actors

Schoolboys forget their books, lose their pens and laugh at dirty jokes. This was true even in the rigorous atmosphere of the Anglo-Saxon classroom.

Mo Moulton’s survey of the political and social aftermath of the Anglo-Irish War of 1919-21 asks challenging questions about how this conflict...

Paul Ginsborg is well known as a political activist in, and historian of, modern Italy. Now he has essayed a massive comparative exploration of...

Eleanor of Aquitaine (1124- 1204) has stood in the spotlight for eight centuries, but paradoxically the real Eleanor remains a shadowy figure....

Diaries can be a holy grail for the historian: written with the immediacy of the moment, capturing the authentic atmosphere of an event,...

It is ironic that one consequence of the failed Scottish referendum on independence is that the English, who have dominated the British Isles for...

Mathematics and numbers are not really part of what we think about when we think about the past, by and large. So it is nice to see Amir Alexander...

The stresses and strains of the British home front during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars are the subject of Jenny Uglow’s new book....

In 1871 Paris revolted against the French state. Many Parisians did not accept France’s defeat in the Franco-Prussian War. Nor did they trust the...

We think we know all about pirates. As a group their ambiguous status is perfectly encapsulated by the phrase ‘one person’s terrorist is another’s...

Malcolm Gaskill offers us hints about what compelled him to write this book. He mentions the ‘astonishing intensity of faith, forbearance and...

The past is another country because we do things differently here. Even before the witnesses...