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Volume 65 Issue 5 May 2015

The aviation pioneer died on May 21st, 1965.

The theologian was denounced by the church on May 4th, 1415.

Paul Fouracre looks at the states that formed after the Fall of Rome and the early historians who questioned whether the barbarians were oppressors or liberators.

Roger Hudson explains why the great cricketer W.G. Grace embraced Indian headwear for a day.

Steven Runciman’s profile of Richard the Lionheart, written at a time of impending crisis in Anglo-Cypriot relations, offers a nuanced and sensitive portrait, writes Minoo Dinshaw.

Following the media rush to commemorate the First World War, Stephen Badsey is disappointed that television has so far failed to embrace the latest historical research on the conflict.

Despite the modern obsession with a good night’s rest, more of us are sleeping less. Perhaps we should pay attention to the advice of early modern doctors, says Katharine A. Craik.

Adrian Leak looks at the life of  Bishop William Stubbs, the last of the amateur historians and arguably the discipline’s first professional.

Glenn Richardson explores the life and personality of Francis I.

Jonathan Phillips offers a comprehensive account of a compelling and controversial topic, whose bitter legacy resonates to this day. 

The First World War transformed women-only Somerville College. It became a hospital for convalescing soldiers, housed poets and writers and changed forever the fortunes of female students, writes Frank Prochaska. 

Richard Overy explains why the West’s confused approach to Germany after Hitler’s death damaged its relationship with the Soviet Union.

Arriving in Syria, three London schoolgirls will find themselves in a ‘medieval’ world where the teenager is an unknown concept.

To the modern imagination, French Jewish life under the Vichy Regime (1940-44) has long been...

This book constitutes a handsome compendium of 18th-century obstetrics, retailing both the stories of practitioners and their patients and...

In May 1991, just a few months after German reunification, I took a train from Berlin to Magdeburg in the heart of the old GDR or East Germany. I...

Between the 630s and 740s armies originating in the Arabian Peninsula achieved a remarkable series of conquests over territory from the Atlantic...

Physicians recommended aphrodisiacs to assist fertility during the 17th century, with foods such as oysters, sweetbreads and caviar considered...

‘There are graves that are alive’, the President of the Belgian League of Remembrance pronounced at Gabrielle Petit’s state funeral in 1919, three...

The grand narrative may have fractured, the longue durée appear bloodless, but interest in the sweep of history seems undiminished:...

As any enchanted visitor knows, the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford is a Victorian cavern stuffed with intriguing objects, hand-written labels and...

Groundbreaking works of history are not often a bare 200 pages in length and generously adorned with...

Few figures in classical antiquity can be the subject of a detailed biography. Cicero and St Augustine each provide a lot of autobiographical...

Every year enough raw cotton is produced for each person in the world to consume 20 T-shirts. Cotton is one of the most common commodities; even...