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Volume 67 Issue 8 August 2017

‘Little Miss Sure Shot’, Annie Oakley, was born 13 August 1860.

We ask leading historians 20 questions on why their research matters, one book everyone should read and their views on the Tudors ...

Both history and historical fiction depend on a combination of imagination and rigorous research. The difference is found in the balance of these ingredients. 

It is not just the Christian musical tradition that has struggled to differentiate between the sacred and the profane. 

Dig deeper into Canada’s history and one encounters a more challenging past than its modern image suggests.

Faced with an extortionate rise in the price of kosher meat, Jewish women in New York’s Lower East Side employed protest tactics borrowed from the radical political movements that prospered in their neighbourhood. 

Columbus kept a daily journal recording his encounters with the indigenous peoples of the New World. But what did they think of him? 

The UDBA is probably the least known major espionage agency of the Cold War. It remains influential, despite the break-up of the country it was formed to defend. 

 

From Elizabethan laws to modern food campaigns: the long history of Britain's patriotic consumers.

Heligoland, a small island in the North Sea, became the site of explosive Anglo-German encounters.

The idea that the ancients believed in Antipodean lands to balance  the globe is a modern invention – and wrong. 

Accounts of the life of Germanicus are complex, fascinating and open to interpretation.

Laws against religious offence in India have altered the writing and understanding of the nation’s past.

Backpackers, travelling through Europe, forged a new wave of international collaboration.

If Bolivia is so rich, why is it so poor? 

Why should we be interested in a sixth-century legal code? The Emperor Justinian (527-565) gets a bad press as a misguided autocrat, but there is...

One’s first thought on contemplating this behemoth is of the Italian phrase meaning that all translators are traducers. What the publishers had in...

The tale of how three 19th-century engineers – the Frenchman Apollinaire Lebas, the Englishman John Dixon (not forgetting his younger brother...

Coffee, chocolate, balcony, draper and yacht are words that entered the English language during the Restoration, as Ian Mortimer points out in...

Thomas Telford (1757-1834) was a prolific transport architect, who split Britain in half when he surveyed, designed and helped manage the building...

When told Amundsen had beaten Scott to the South Pole, Lord Curzon remarked: ‘I see the dogs have won.’ The double-entendre was...

In London’s National Portrait Gallery a large canvas depicts Britain’s ermined decision-makers during the American War of Independence. Central to...

Daniel Todman is a first-rate military historian, but in Britain’s War he has written an economic and social history, as well as a...