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Volume 67 Issue 9 September 2017

Born 29 September 106 BC.

History is at odds with our desire for simple certainties. Can its cultivation of complexity create a better future?

How and why did concert-going change from a raucous, noisy affair to one of hushed appreciation?

Even the most obscure topic can be fascinating, and fascination can be found in the most unlikely places.

We ask 20 questions of leading historians on why their research matters, one book everyone should read and their views on the Tudors …

Despite popular misconceptions and its aristocratic origins, for part of its history opera was inextricably linked with popular culture – no more so than in the 1920s. 

The sinking by Japanese aircraft of HMS Prince of Wales and HMS Repulse in December 1941 and the subsequent loss of Singapore was a grievous blow to British morale. But have historians misunderstood what really happened? 

Do Stoic philosophy and the family mix? The writings of Seneca show how the model Stoic, relying on nothing but his own mind, can still be a loving family man. 

Despite a total lack of evidence, the belief that grains of wheat found in Ancient Egyptian tombs could produce bountiful crops was surprisingly hardy. 

Seventy years on from its creation, crisis-ridden Pakistan is a very different country from the one envisioned by its founder, Muhammad Ali Jinnah. 

The dramatic life of the outlaw and special agent Eşref Bey epitomises the end of the Ottoman Empire.

The Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland in 1167 sowed the seeds for centuries of tension between England and the Irish.

Fiercely anti-Communist, Clement Attlee found Britain’s intelligence agencies to be invaluable tools.

Finland celebrates its centenary in December 2017, but the concept of Suur Suomi – ‘Greater Finland’ – has existed since at least the 18th century.

The Israeli novelist, Amos Oz, described Yitzhak Rabin as ‘not a charismatic man, but rather a logical, skilful captain’. Rabin was both a...

The history of science and technology is often told as the story of firsts. The received wisdom about the history of the jet engine in the Second...

Winston Churchill mused on the usefulness of studying history, observing that ‘the farther backward you can look, the farther forward you are...

Wendy Moore draws us into the illustrious world of Professor John Elliotson, while exposing the challenges between new and traditional medicine...

Everyone has heard of the Rosetta Stone. Not so familiar, but equally compelling, is a purely Greek artefact of the same period found in a first-...

Kathryn Hughes feels that most modern biographies lack an essential ingredient, which is life itself, particularly in its most basic form – the...

In recent decades, much of the scholarship on the history of crime has focused on the causes célèbres that gripped Europe and the US in...

Archaeology can provide new historical narratives for familiar places. The excavations at Portmahomack on Tarbat Ness, beyond the Great Glen on...