National Army Museum

Michael Paris

Britain’s involvement in the Middle East between the wars proved a rich seam for authors of adventure stories. Michael Paris shows how these, in turn, helped to reinforce the imperial mission.

 Michael Paris examines the way in which aspects of D-Day were filmed at the time and have subsequently been reconstructed in popular cinema.

Michael Paris describes the film record of the North African victory, and how the footage represents a tour de force in terms of wartime documentary and national effort.

Michael Paris looks at the romanticised image of war in boys’ popular fiction prior to 1914, and at the sustaining appeal of the genre in spite of the realities of that event.

Michael Paris looks at pioneering 1920s film about war in the air over the Western Front, the passions it aroused and the genre it created.

Michael Paris looks at how science fiction and popular literature shaped personal prejudices and political agendas about 'destruction from the skies'.

During the early days of UK involvement in World War II, official British films deliberately created a particular view of the air war, perhaps distorting our perceptions of some key phases.

New publications on the British cinema industry from the early 20th century

Lost illusions and gung-ho patriotism have both featured prominently in Hollywood’s reaction to the Vietnam War, but not to date some of the more unpleasant aspects of the conflict.