University of Chichester: Study History and Politics.

Reviews

Front cover of The First European: A History of Alexander in the Age of Empire.

One’s first thought on contemplating this behemoth is of the Italian phrase meaning that all translators are traducers. What the publishers had in mind when they translated Pierre Briant’s Alexandre des lumières: Fragments d’histoire...

Front cover of Cleopatra’s Needles: The Lost Obelisks of Egypt.

The tale of how three 19th-century engineers – the Frenchman Apollinaire Lebas, the Englishman John Dixon (not forgetting his younger brother Waynman) and the American Henry Gorringe – managed to transport their respective obelisks to London,...

Front cover of The Time Traveller's Guide to Restoration Britain.

Coffee, chocolate, balcony, draper and yacht are words that entered the English language during the Restoration, as Ian Mortimer points out in this thoroughly entertaining guide to life in Restoration Britain. It was, he suggests, a turbulent...

Front cover of Man of Iron

Thomas Telford (1757-1834) was a prolific transport architect, who split Britain in half when he surveyed, designed and helped manage the building of the Caledonian Canal (1803-22). This impressive achievement connected Scotland’s east and west...

Front cover of Savage Nobles and Noble Savages.

When told Amundsen had beaten Scott to the South Pole, Lord Curzon remarked: ‘I see the dogs have won.’ The double-entendre was intentional. The Norwegian had used dog-sledges. Scott opted for the nobler man haulage – and died of...

A Revolution in Color: The World  of John Singleton Copley

In London’s National Portrait Gallery a large canvas depicts Britain’s ermined decision-makers during the American War of Independence. Central to the importance of the painting, though physically off centre within it, is a stricken William Pitt...

Front cover of Britain's War

Daniel Todman is a first-rate military historian, but in Britain’s War he has written an economic and social history, as well as a political and military story. Its heart is the story of the people’s war, wonderfully illustrated from the...

Michel de Montaigne was not just the inventor of a genre, nor merely the author of the Essays, which have gripped readers from Shakespeare to Virginia Woolf and Orson Welles. He also led an extraordinary life. Descended from merchants,...

With In the Name of the Family, Sarah Dunant continues her narrative on the campaigns of the Borgia pope, Alexander VI, to carve out a family possession in Italy. Florence is hanging on to its Republican status, having booted out the...

In The Making of the British Landscape, Nicholas Crane takes us on a remarkable journey through the deep history of these isles. En route, he takes us back to W.G. Hoskins and his Making of the English Landscape (1955). I was...

Since the fall of the Iron Curtain, Berlin has emerged as one of the most historically and culturally fascinating cities. Germans have systematically addressed their Nazi past: the crowds of visitors from around the world touring the city find...

The lives of six Victorian radicals shed light on the struggle to establish feminism, social reform and the Labour movement.

This study of three British women, two men and one American woman – ‘six searchers who tried to...

From a priory hospital in the fields, to the Huguenots, Jack the Ripper and the Kray twins, Spitalfields has always been considered a place apart.

Spitalfields has always been London’s border country, a constellation of...

Famine years – when the grain harvest failed and hunger stalked the land – were an all-too-frequent event in England before the nineteenth-century. This book seeks to show how both the government and ordinary people responded to these recurrent...

The big idea behind this book is that the most important difference between Europe and the rest of the world, which led to the Industrial Revolution and modern economic growth, was the dawning of the Enlightenment, with its favourable...

When the Scottish explorer John Dundas Cochrane visited the town of Tobolsk in the early 1820s, he found ‘very good society … and the strongest features of content … in this hitherto supposed metropolis of barbarism and cruelty’. But few others...